Category Archives: Community News

Homelessness Update

Hud awards $1.95 Billion in continuum of care grants

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded funding to almost 7,600 local homeless service providers to end homelessness. This year’s Continuum of Care (CoC) competition continued its trend of rewarding high-performing, Housing First programs.

See a full list of awardees »

Building owners managers can play a role in ending homelessness

In high-rent, low-vacancy markets the need for subsidized housing outweighs the supply. Owners of HUD-assisted multifamily buildings can apply a “homeless preference” to their waitlist to help house a homeless individual or family quickly.

Learn More about the “Homeless Preference” »

Eight things the new congress may do with big impacts on homelessness

Big change is underway in Washington, DC! While there is little information coming from the Trump administration’s transition team about policy, there are some things we can plan for based on what we do know. Read our blog on potential changes to the Affordable Care Act, appropriations, spending limits and more.

Read the Blog »

Final rule establishes performance standards for RHY grantees

The Families and Youth Services Bureau has released its final rule on its Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHYA) programs.

The rule reflects existing statutory requirements in the RHYA and changes made via the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008. More specifically, the rule establishes program performance standards for RHY grantees providing services to eligible youth and their families.

The final rule also includes additional requirements that apply to the Basic Center, Transitional Living, and Street Outreach Programs, such as nondiscrimination, background checks, outreach, and training.

Read the Final Rule »

Making Rapid Re-Housing Partnerships: Lots of Work To Do!

by Sharon McDonald

In September, people from across the country participated in our Rapid Re-Housing Summit to explore successes and assess the next steps to advance the model further. One of the key topics participants explored was developing partnerships. The big takeaway? We have a lot of work to do!

Read more »

Ready for the New Congress: 8 Things They Might Do With Big Impacts on Homelessness

by Steve Berg

Big change is underway in Washington, DC! On Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, the same party will take control of both Congress and the White House. This was also the case at the beginning of the Obama, W. Bush and Clinton administrations. The result was that all three administrations were able to get major legislation passed very early.

There is little information coming from the Trump administration’s transition team about policy. But, there are some things we can plan for based on what we do know.

Read more »

How Salt Lake City Makes Rapid Re-Housing Work

by naehblog

For rapid re-housing to work best, it needs to be integrated into your community plan. It should be a part of Coordinated Entry, ingrained in the processes at emergency shelters, and supported by committed resources from many partners who help families re-build their support networks and stability in housing.

Read more »

The above information was provided by The National Alliance to End Homelessness in an email.

NJ Receives $45,574,610 to End Homelessness

On December 20, 2016, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced $45,574,610 in HUD funding to NJ communities working to end homelessness.

With the exception of one state, South Dakota which has one Continuum of Care, no other state out-performed New Jersey in receiving an increase in HUD funding.

Monarch congratulates all New Jersey’s counties on their awards, including the 17 counties Monarch works with to submit successful funding applications.

New Jersey organizations received a combination of renewed, reallocated and new funding.

This year, HUD continued to challenge state and local planning organizations called “Continuums of Care” to support their highest performing local programs that have proven most effective in meeting the needs of homeless persons in their communities.

Many of these state and local planners also embraced HUD’s call to shift funds from existing under-performing projects to create new ones that are based on best practices that will further their efforts to prevent and end homelessness.

NJCounts 2016 found 8,941 homeless men, women and children across the state of New Jersey. This showed a decrease of 1,279 persons (12.4%) from 2015. While the decrease shows progress, the count still shows the critical need for voucher and homeless assistance funding.

This federal funding will provide much needed assistance to our most vulnerable populations by supporting the organizations on the front lines in the battle against homelessness in New Jersey. As a former mayor, I know how important increasing access to safe and reliable housing is to strengthening our communities.  We have a commitment to extending a hand to our brothers and sisters who need it most by helping ensure they have every opportunity to lift themselves up.

said Sen. Cory Booker

Read More

The above information was provided by the Monarch Housing Associates in an email.

In Case You Missed It…

This week at CBPP, we focused on health care, the federal budget and taxes, state budgets and taxes, and food assistance.

  • On health care, Matt Broaddus and Edwin Park highlighted the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s historic coverage gains.  Our state-by-state interactive illustrated how ACA repeal would undermine these gains and leave many more uninsured.  Sarah Lueck explained that the Republican approach to repeal means millions will lose pre-existing condition protections.  Anna Bailey noted that despite the newly signed Cures Act, Medicaid remains the major source of funding for states to treat mental illness and substance use disorders.  Shelby Gonzales reminded consumers to enroll in marketplace plans for coverage that starts on January 1.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Richard Kogan and David Reich found that House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price’s proposals to change the budget process would harm key programs aimed at moderate- and low-income families and favor tax breaks for the wealthy.  Chye-Ching Huang and Paul Van de Water used new Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center data to show that millionaires would receive most of the tax cuts from repealing the ACA.  Chloe Cho’s state-by-state look at repealing the estate tax demonstrated that only the wealthiest few Americans would benefit.  We excerpted Jared Bernstein’s Washington Post op-ed listing why policymakers shouldn’t cut taxes.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol analyzed how states can use tax policy to stop increasing inequality and start reducing it, and our state-by-state fact sheets reveal the striking concentration of incomes among the wealthiest residents in every state. 
  • On food assistance, Dottie Rosenbaum and Ed Bolen explained why reports claiming the alleged success of reimposing a three-month time limit on SNAP in Kansas and Maine are misleading.

Chart of the week: Large Coverage Gains Under Affordable Care Act

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Why Trump Should Strengthen the Housing Voucher Program
Huffington Post
December 16, 2016

The stealth attack on the social safety net will come through boring budget processes
Daily Kos
December 14, 2016

Why even the strongest Republican efforts can’t defeat the welfare state
Washington Post
December 12, 2016

Surprise! Obamacare Repeal Includes a Stealth Tax Cut For Top Earners
Talking Points Memo
December 9, 2016

What Would It Take to Replace the Pay Working-Class Americans Have Lost?
New York Times
December 9, 2016

The above information was provided by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in an email.

How State Policymakers Can Decrease Income Inequality

Over the last 35 years, income gains in the American economy have accrued largely to the richest households, while many middle- and lower-income Americans haven’t shared in the nation’s growing prosperity.

In a new paper from CBPP, we explain how this income disparity has reduced opportunities for working people striving to get ahead and weakened our overall economy. Choices by state policymakers can make can make matters worse or improve them.

As Elizabeth McNichol writes:

“Virtually all states collect more taxes from moderate- and lower-income families, as a share of their income, than high-income families. This increases inequality by reducing after-tax incomes more deeply among low- and middle-income families than high-income families.”

State policymakers have numerous tools to ensure that high-income earners pay their fair share and lower-income earners don’t face increased tax responsibility. These include expanding taxes on inherited wealth, strengthening taxes on corporations, and enacting state earned income tax credits.  They should take these steps to make sure everyone benefits from economic prosperity.

Read the Report

Download the PDF (23pp)

The above information was provided by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in an email.

APN’s E.D. in the Spotlight + More of Today’s News

MEMBER MENTIONS

Profile: Growing Up in Poverty Has Helped Shape Her Choice of Career
NJ Spotlight

The executive director of the Anti-Poverty Network of New Jersey, Renee Koubiadis wants to do nothing less than solve the problem of poverty…Growing up in poverty has influenced Koubiadis’ views and her goals for the organization. For one, she said the state needs to raise the amount of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families benefits, formerly called welfare for families with children.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/16/10/11/profile-growing-up-in-poverty-has-helped-shape-her-choice-of-career/?utm_source=NJ+Spotlight++Master+List&utm_campaign=28aa3f31ee-Daily_Digest2_5_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1d26f473a7-28aa3f31ee-398638901

Baykeeper Funded for Plastic Pollution Research and Outreach
Atlantic Highlands Herald

NY/NJ Baykeeper has been awarded Urban Waters Funding from the US Environmental Protection Agency Region 2 (USEPA) to further microplastic research, advocacy, and community outreach to prevent plastics from entering local waterways and contaminating the food chain.PA Region 2 Urban Waters funding will specifically fund NY/NJ Baykeeper’s activities to identify, reduce, and prevent plastic pollution, such as bottles, bags, styrofoam cups and straws, transported via stormwater from reaching the lower Passaic River and Newark Bay Complex. Project partners include the Ironbound Community Corporation and Rutgers University.

http://www.ahherald.com/newsbrief/monmouth-news/23086-baykeeper-funded-for-plastic-pollution-research-and-outreach

Coalition Pushes for Public Health Care Option in NJ
NJTV

A few dozen organizations, including New Jersey Citizen Action, have banned together creating the NJ for Health Care coalition. They back a public option, because they say it creates competition allowing the government to compete with commercial carriers for coverage.

http://www.njtvonline.org/news/video/coalition-pushes-public-health-care-option-nj/

The 1st Annual Greenwood Community Street Festival: “The Point of Change”
TapInto

This Saturday, October 15th on 4th Avenue in East Orange, Sierra House and the Ampere Civic Improvement Association are hosting the 1st Annual Greenwood Community Street Festival. This event promises be an exciting opportunity for the community to come together, enjoy music, learn about gardening, engage in activities for the kids, shop, get information from local nonprofits, and meet local business owners.

https://www.tapinto.net/towns/east-orange-slash-orange/articles/the-1st-annual-greenwood-community-street-festiva

ISSUES

Old Bridge officials explain affordable housing options
Suburban News

The settlement of 3,109 dwelling units as part of Old Bridge’s Fair Share Housing obligation is in the hands of the Township Council. A meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on Oct. 14 in the council chambers for a public hearing and final vote on the ordinances required for implementing the 1999 to 2025 Housing Element and Fair Share Plan.

http://www.gmnews.com/2016/10/11/old-bridge-officials-explain-affordable-housing-options/

The above information was provided by the Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey in an email, October 12th.