Category Archives: Community News

Sharing the Center on Budget Housing Policy News

2017 Funding

In a new blog, Doug Rice explains that a recent HUD letter indicates that PHAs will likely have to eliminate vouchers for 55,000 low-income families, seniors, and people with disabilities if policymakers renew Housing Choice Vouchers for the rest of fiscal year 2017 at the average funding level that the House and Senate appropriations committees approved last summer. Even worse, 135,000 vouchers will disappear if policymakers extend the current freeze on voucher funds for the rest of the year.

Whether Congress includes an increase in 2017 voucher renewal funds probably won’t be clear until the week of April 24, when policymakers return from a two-week recess to wrap up the final 2017 funding bill. 

Separately, the Trump Administration has requested that Congress cut $18 billion from non-defense domestic programs in 2017, relative to the agreed-upon spending level established by the Budget Control Act. The proposed cuts include $1.7 billion in reductions to HUD programs (primarily Community Development Block Grants).  The Administration has proposed these cuts to partly offset its requests for $3 billion in additional funds for immigration actions (including a Mexican border wall) and a $25 billion increase in defense funding for 2017.  Both Democrats and Republicans have criticized the proposed cuts, and early indications are that they are likely to ignore them in finalizing 2017 appropriations.

2018 Funding

In a new analysis, CBPP’s Isaac Shapiro and other Budget team colleagues find that “President Trump’s “skinny” budget would eliminate four discretionary block grants that mainly serve low-income people [including CDBG and HOME], and set the stage for substantial cuts to others. As a result, it would reduce overall funding for block grants for low- and moderate-income people that are “discretionary” (or annually appropriated) programs by half or more just between 2017 and 2018.”  Even if Congress declines to go along with these proposed cuts, they underscore the danger of block-granting social programs, as policymakers may again propose for Medicaid and possibly for SNAP.
 
Vouchers Work
 
Starting today, we’re explaining the value and effectiveness of Housing Choice Vouchers in our “Vouchers Work” blog series.  In twice-weekly posts over seven weeks,  we’ll provide the latest facts and figures about the Housing Choice Voucher program, the largest rental assistance program to help families with children, working people, seniors, and people with disabilities afford decent, stable housing.
 
Today’s blog provides an overview of the HCV program and who it serves, including updated demographic data for 2016.  In subsequent posts, we’ll dig more into what the voucher program accomplishes.  The series will be available on a new Vouchers Work page soon.

Sharing the Housing and Community Network of New Jersey’s March 29th Issues

NJ Spotlight, NJTV to Host Two Gubernatorial Primary Debates
NJ Spotlight
NJ Spotlight, in partnership with NJTV Public Television, has been chosen to co-host two of the New Jersey gubernatorial primary debates this spring. The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission yesterday picked the partnership to host two debates, one for the Democratic candidates and one for the Republican candidates.
http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/17/03/28/nj-spotlight-njtv-to-host-two-gubernatorial-primary-debates/?utm_source=NJ+Spotlight++Master+List&utm_campaign=ef40534a0f-Daily_Digest2_5_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1d26f473a7-ef40534a0f-398638901

Summit Planning Board Unanimously Endorses Fair Share Housing Ordinance Amended to Address Resident Objections Regarding DeForest Ave. ‘Overlay Zone’
TapInto
The Summit Planning Board has endorsed an ordinance to comply with the City’s recent agreement on affordable housing, but that ordinance has been amended, apparently to assure that objections of residents of the area of 25 DeForest Avenue are overcome. When the Planning Board decided to go along with the agreement on affordable housing between the City and the Fair Share Housing Center in January, one of the linchpins to that agreement with the creation of “overlay zones” — eight areas of the City that could allow for affordable housing.
https://www.tapinto.net/towns/summit/sections/government/articles/summit-planning-board-unanimously-endorses-fair-s

Plainsboro Planning Board approves 100-unit affordable housing project
MercerSpace
While many New Jersey towns are struggling to determine the amount of affordable housing they need to provide, Plainsboro has taken the next step towards getting affordable units actually built. Last December, the town cut a deal with Community Investment Strategies, a for-profit builder based in Lawrence Township, to help meet Plainsboro’s latest fair share obligation. The township planning board approved the The Place at Plainsboro at its meeting on March 20.
http://mercerspace.com/2017/03/28/plainsboro-planning-board-approves-100-unit-affordable-housing-project/

Parsippany meeting an education in affordable housing
The Record
Parsippany’s biggest challenge is affordable housing, Mayor James Barberio told a group of residents at a recent meeting. The mayor said because there has been much discussion about affordable housing within the community he held the meeting to clear the air and educate residents on the issues…One resident asked about the impact of new residents to the township and Inglesino said “you can’t use an influx of school children as a basis to deny your affordable housing obligation.”
http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/morris/parsippany-troy-hills/2017/03/28/parsippany-meeting-education-affordable-housing/99708296/

These Nonprofits Say Trump’s Budget Could Hurt the Fight for Homeless Veterans
Fortune
The push to end homelessness among veterans would suffer without the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, which is up for elimination under President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, nonprofits and local officials say….Adding to the ire and confusion, the budget proposal also says the Trump administration will support Department of Veterans Affairs programs for homeless and at-risk veterans and their families, but doesn’t elaborate. Trump, who promised on the campaign trail to support veterans, wants to give the VA a 6% increase. Still, the federal government needs someone to make sure housing resources are well spent, and to look across agencies for solutions instead of just down at their own, advocates say.
http://fortune.com/2017/03/28/donald-trump-budget-homeless-veterans/

President Trump’s First Budget and Build a Thriving NJ

Mercer Alliance to End Homelessness is sharing information from Monarch Housing that relates to the federal budget for housing and related services.

President Trump’s First Budget Could Cripple Affordable Housing

View the PowerPoint slides

View the webinar video

Build a Thriving NJ campaign

If we build homes we can afford, and revitalize the communities where we work and live, we can Build a Thriving New Jersey. Our families, friends and neighbors are the heart of our state and the backbone of our economy. If we can’t afford to live here, we cannot get our economy back on track.

The next leaders of NJ must commit $600 million annually to create homes we can afford. For a one-pager on the campaign with details of how the $600 million will be used visit this link.

If you have not endorsed the campaign, we strongly encourage you to visit this link and do it today!!

We need resources on the state and federal level if we are going to end homelessness and housing poverty in NJ!

#NJCounts 2017 Reaches Out to Homeless Families, Individuals, Youth and Veterans

NJCounts 2017

On January 25th, 2017  homeless service providers and volunteers conducted a count of homeless individuals and families in Mercer County as part of the #NJCounts 2017. This count provides a snapshot of the scope of homelessness in our community and across the nation and is vital to assessing need and leveraging resources to prevent and end homelessness.   Click here​ to read the full article. 

N.J. SUPREME COURT AFFIRMS ‘GAP PERIOD’ NEEDS, REJECTS TOWNS’ ATTEMPTS TO EXCLUDE THOUSANDS

The Mercer Alliance to End Homelessness applauds the work of the Fair Share Housing Center and their allies and the New Jersey Supreme Court decision in support of affordable housing obligations for the “gap period”  between 1999 and 2015.

This decision is a significant step forward in creating fair and balanced housing for tens of thousands of New Jersey families and people with disabilities, and a commitment to fight discriminatory interpretation of the Mount Laurel decision.

Moving forward, much work will need to be done to determine realistic solutions in implementing this decision, to ensure that its intent and spirit is not derailed by a continuing series of legal challenges and tangled bureaucracy. – Frank Cirillo

 

Homelessness Update

Hud awards $1.95 Billion in continuum of care grants

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded funding to almost 7,600 local homeless service providers to end homelessness. This year’s Continuum of Care (CoC) competition continued its trend of rewarding high-performing, Housing First programs.

See a full list of awardees »

Building owners managers can play a role in ending homelessness

In high-rent, low-vacancy markets the need for subsidized housing outweighs the supply. Owners of HUD-assisted multifamily buildings can apply a “homeless preference” to their waitlist to help house a homeless individual or family quickly.

Learn More about the “Homeless Preference” »

Eight things the new congress may do with big impacts on homelessness

Big change is underway in Washington, DC! While there is little information coming from the Trump administration’s transition team about policy, there are some things we can plan for based on what we do know. Read our blog on potential changes to the Affordable Care Act, appropriations, spending limits and more.

Read the Blog »

Final rule establishes performance standards for RHY grantees

The Families and Youth Services Bureau has released its final rule on its Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHYA) programs.

The rule reflects existing statutory requirements in the RHYA and changes made via the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008. More specifically, the rule establishes program performance standards for RHY grantees providing services to eligible youth and their families.

The final rule also includes additional requirements that apply to the Basic Center, Transitional Living, and Street Outreach Programs, such as nondiscrimination, background checks, outreach, and training.

Read the Final Rule »

Making Rapid Re-Housing Partnerships: Lots of Work To Do!

by Sharon McDonald

In September, people from across the country participated in our Rapid Re-Housing Summit to explore successes and assess the next steps to advance the model further. One of the key topics participants explored was developing partnerships. The big takeaway? We have a lot of work to do!

Read more »

Ready for the New Congress: 8 Things They Might Do With Big Impacts on Homelessness

by Steve Berg

Big change is underway in Washington, DC! On Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, the same party will take control of both Congress and the White House. This was also the case at the beginning of the Obama, W. Bush and Clinton administrations. The result was that all three administrations were able to get major legislation passed very early.

There is little information coming from the Trump administration’s transition team about policy. But, there are some things we can plan for based on what we do know.

Read more »

How Salt Lake City Makes Rapid Re-Housing Work

by naehblog

For rapid re-housing to work best, it needs to be integrated into your community plan. It should be a part of Coordinated Entry, ingrained in the processes at emergency shelters, and supported by committed resources from many partners who help families re-build their support networks and stability in housing.

Read more »

The above information was provided by The National Alliance to End Homelessness in an email.

NJ Receives $45,574,610 to End Homelessness

On December 20, 2016, Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced $45,574,610 in HUD funding to NJ communities working to end homelessness.

With the exception of one state, South Dakota which has one Continuum of Care, no other state out-performed New Jersey in receiving an increase in HUD funding.

Monarch congratulates all New Jersey’s counties on their awards, including the 17 counties Monarch works with to submit successful funding applications.

New Jersey organizations received a combination of renewed, reallocated and new funding.

This year, HUD continued to challenge state and local planning organizations called “Continuums of Care” to support their highest performing local programs that have proven most effective in meeting the needs of homeless persons in their communities.

Many of these state and local planners also embraced HUD’s call to shift funds from existing under-performing projects to create new ones that are based on best practices that will further their efforts to prevent and end homelessness.

NJCounts 2016 found 8,941 homeless men, women and children across the state of New Jersey. This showed a decrease of 1,279 persons (12.4%) from 2015. While the decrease shows progress, the count still shows the critical need for voucher and homeless assistance funding.

This federal funding will provide much needed assistance to our most vulnerable populations by supporting the organizations on the front lines in the battle against homelessness in New Jersey. As a former mayor, I know how important increasing access to safe and reliable housing is to strengthening our communities.  We have a commitment to extending a hand to our brothers and sisters who need it most by helping ensure they have every opportunity to lift themselves up.

said Sen. Cory Booker

Read More

The above information was provided by the Monarch Housing Associates in an email.

In Case You Missed It…

This week at CBPP, we focused on health care, the federal budget and taxes, state budgets and taxes, and food assistance.

  • On health care, Matt Broaddus and Edwin Park highlighted the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s historic coverage gains.  Our state-by-state interactive illustrated how ACA repeal would undermine these gains and leave many more uninsured.  Sarah Lueck explained that the Republican approach to repeal means millions will lose pre-existing condition protections.  Anna Bailey noted that despite the newly signed Cures Act, Medicaid remains the major source of funding for states to treat mental illness and substance use disorders.  Shelby Gonzales reminded consumers to enroll in marketplace plans for coverage that starts on January 1.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Richard Kogan and David Reich found that House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price’s proposals to change the budget process would harm key programs aimed at moderate- and low-income families and favor tax breaks for the wealthy.  Chye-Ching Huang and Paul Van de Water used new Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center data to show that millionaires would receive most of the tax cuts from repealing the ACA.  Chloe Cho’s state-by-state look at repealing the estate tax demonstrated that only the wealthiest few Americans would benefit.  We excerpted Jared Bernstein’s Washington Post op-ed listing why policymakers shouldn’t cut taxes.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol analyzed how states can use tax policy to stop increasing inequality and start reducing it, and our state-by-state fact sheets reveal the striking concentration of incomes among the wealthiest residents in every state. 
  • On food assistance, Dottie Rosenbaum and Ed Bolen explained why reports claiming the alleged success of reimposing a three-month time limit on SNAP in Kansas and Maine are misleading.

Chart of the week: Large Coverage Gains Under Affordable Care Act

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Why Trump Should Strengthen the Housing Voucher Program
Huffington Post
December 16, 2016

The stealth attack on the social safety net will come through boring budget processes
Daily Kos
December 14, 2016

Why even the strongest Republican efforts can’t defeat the welfare state
Washington Post
December 12, 2016

Surprise! Obamacare Repeal Includes a Stealth Tax Cut For Top Earners
Talking Points Memo
December 9, 2016

What Would It Take to Replace the Pay Working-Class Americans Have Lost?
New York Times
December 9, 2016

The above information was provided by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in an email.

How State Policymakers Can Decrease Income Inequality

Over the last 35 years, income gains in the American economy have accrued largely to the richest households, while many middle- and lower-income Americans haven’t shared in the nation’s growing prosperity.

In a new paper from CBPP, we explain how this income disparity has reduced opportunities for working people striving to get ahead and weakened our overall economy. Choices by state policymakers can make can make matters worse or improve them.

As Elizabeth McNichol writes:

“Virtually all states collect more taxes from moderate- and lower-income families, as a share of their income, than high-income families. This increases inequality by reducing after-tax incomes more deeply among low- and middle-income families than high-income families.”

State policymakers have numerous tools to ensure that high-income earners pay their fair share and lower-income earners don’t face increased tax responsibility. These include expanding taxes on inherited wealth, strengthening taxes on corporations, and enacting state earned income tax credits.  They should take these steps to make sure everyone benefits from economic prosperity.

Read the Report

Download the PDF (23pp)

The above information was provided by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in an email.